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in 2011 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/maidsandman19301930stud 



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])iiblisli('(l by 

The SENIORo and JUNIORo CLASSES of 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 



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Foisaii et have oliin jticmiiiissc iuiahit — Vergil 



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Tliat this little book may help us to recall those memories, some 

hitter, some sweet, with which our high school days were 

filled, is the wish of the annual staff of 1930. 



cTVlAIDS and a c5MAN | 



Facn/t\ 



T. H. (AltliKI r. I'riiuipu] 



Aliss A. I)ni!iii in II \i\> 

Issixtdiil I'riiiiipal 

Mi.ss Anmk M. P\(,fc; 

French 

Miss Gkutrlide J. t"oMi;i 

English 

Miss Marcia A. Clmsk 

Domestic Art 

Miss Willamette Green 

Mathematics 

Mrs. M. a. Kii)(;eli 

Latin 

iVIiss Lois Eve 

Science 

Miss l)oROTH^ H\li!EI;t 

Music 

Miss Eleanor Boatwricht 

History 

Miss Ann Braddv 

Mathematics 
Mrs. W. C. Lyeth 

English 

Mrs. W. W. Snow 

French 

Miss Edith Nachman 

Geograph y 
Miss Eora M. Fearce 

English 
Miss Susie L\ncford 

Mathematics 
Miss Eloise 1\ orris 

Miss M\R^ (;illilam) 

Mathematics 

Miss Elizabeth Hemo 

English 

Miss Belle Walker 

History and Civics 



\Ilss ■SlU'i L Jul l\(.i;\\i 

Commercial 
Miss Mar\ T. Miller 

Spanish 
Miss Elizvheth Rice 

I'hysical Training 

iVliss Mabel E. Boren 

I'hysical Training 

Miss Helen Smith 

English 

Miss Marguerite Cousins 

English 

Mess Elizabeth Wells 

Commercial 

Miss Mabel Byrd 

English 

Miss Bernice Wiese 

History 
Miss Annie B. Daniel 

English 

Miss Elizabeth Kreps 

Biology 

Miss Pauline Patterson 

Commercial 
Miss Elizabeth Hayes 

Commercial 

Miss Sara Fullbricht 

Mathematics 

Miss Elizabeth Dowling 

Mrs. Margaret White 

Domestic Science 

Miss Naomi Lirich 

Commercial Art 
Mrs. M. M. Owens 

Librarian 

Miss Ann G. Smith 

Assistant Domestic Science 



Miss Louise Wilson 



1930 



cTWAIDS and acTWAN 



Tlie Moving Finger H^rites— 




m»m ia]ailllllllllllM]MIMMMKM 1930 




Betsy Ross 

Who with nimble fingers 
made our first flag. 



(£ta55C5 



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oTVlAIDS and a cTWAN 



Senior CJass 

OFFICERS 

President Mai die Mae Jakkell 

Vice-President \\ VNONA James 

Secretary-Treasurer Ruth Grear 



iMoTTO: "To the Stars Through the Dolts and Bars." 
Class Colors: Blue and U liite. 
Class Flower: Shasta Daisy. 



T/ic E?u/ 

{With apologies to 4. A. Milne) 



When I was a freshman 
Fd just bejiiiin 

When I was a Sophomore 
I thoiiiiht I knew more 

When I was a Junior 
I was smart as rouhl be 

But now Fm a Senior 

I am clever as clever — 

I think ril be one forever "n" ever. 

Dorothy Sharp. '30. 




c^MAIDS and acTWAN 




'() lead some Poiver the giftie gie us 
To see oursels as ithers see us." 

— Burns. 



Margaiskt Alston 

liijih f^oarini;. swecl sirijiiiii: laik. 



Eleanor Binns 

a dainty Diesden shepherdess — an 
old-fasliiont'd nosegay. 



Margarlt Ashley 

\\a\iiifi iirain Uiu^liini; in the siinsliiiie- 
hiijtht coloreci paints. 



Ruth Burton 

dnlls with curly brown hair- 
soft glances. 



Helen Batten 

symphony in blue and gold — pastel 
shades of rich taflfeta. 



Mildred Cakstakphen 

licam of sunlight stealing throng 
crack into a darkened room. 



Eleanor Bearden 

a little living IJaphael. 



Margaret Chapman 

ikes, canoes on (|uiet lakes — games of 
speed and skill. 



Dolly Bentley 

S]tain — colors of red and >ello\\ mantillas 



Merle Cook 

trailing dresses — a demure garden in a 
sheltered nook. 



1930 « !lllillllll i i «'^III I II IIMiM 



cTWAIDSandac^MAN lll^/^lllllllllliillllfe^ 



Mary C.itKEi) 

pi Im little pansies i:r(i\\inji in neat ni\\> 



Katie Evans 

a rnciilel seeretaiy. neat, (p)iet ami 
competent. 



Mary Dennis 

(lirninMli\f ciittages — kitcliens seented 
u ith savorv foods. 



Viola Figgins 

deep purple wild violets. 

A"WooDS Devereaux 

a limpid [lool sheltered liy 
oveiiiangina trees. 



Helen Freeman 

filive skinned maidens of southern lands 
the strains of Hawaiian guitars. 



Sarah Doughty 

fiay niisehievous hrownie overHowiiij: 
with alee. 



Josephine Fry 

.1 tiny piece of rare old tapestry. 

lieautihiliy \M»ven of green, red. 

i;nld. silver. 



\ ERNA Ewes 

laughter, light -sun on the ocean 

Frances Garten 

a talking doll with laige ihijia Mne eves. 




1930 



oTVIAIDS and a cTVlAN | 




Agnes Gay 

tlie silliness and quiet of summer twiliglit. 



Rltii Grear 

luaint ladies dressed in laces and crino- 
lines — daintv black velvet bows. 



Eleanor Gercke 

nigbt. moon — Romance. 



Mary Frances Green 

ivacious little Frencb dancer. 



Llewellyn Gibson 

books in bindings of rich red morocco 
— rare editions. 



iMattie Lou (Jrimaud 

iliir automobile -large bouquets of 
summer flowers. 



ZcE Audrey Gleason 

a ten o'clock scholar. 



Doris Gwinn 

lark red ruby lighted bv hidden fires. 



Claire Graham 

the modern girl, courageous 
and resourceful. 



Mary Hagcerty 

carnivals — bright streamers — balloons- 
gay costumes. 



1930 IE 



,: cTVIAIDS and a c>IAN [llii^i^Mil] 



Agnes Halforu 

lances on suninier evenings— tnuonliiilu 
(in i:til(!en hair. 



Margie Holland 

nunlest ladies of the ante belhnn Smtli. 



Margaret Hallman 

a traffic cup. 



Hazel Hutcheson 

the old blue-backed speller. 



Hazel Harley 

megaphones and crowds of jolly picnicers 



Anita James 

siinlisi;ht on bronze-hued hair. 



Helen Harrison 

sailing — blue-coated cadets. 



Mary Ellen James 

roving gypsies, campfires. 



Margaret Hogan 

'nv\\ white nuiiznolia blossoms. 



Wynona James 

a wee hurnmiui: biril. Moonlight .Sniu^ta. 




1 Q^n '^MllMIIIIH^I^IIIIIIIIilllllll^ff/^lllllll]^ 



cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 



af/^^llilHIll! 



ui^n^mig 




Maudie Mae Jarrell 

eiUrancinc melodies — l)est sellers. 



ESTELLE LeVKOFF 

If innie Lightner 

'All the worlds a stase- 



K\THLEEN Jones 

kodaks — sunshine on the front lawn. 



Mildred Lorick 

Patou model. Paris siowns. 



Gertrude Kitchens 

eighteen dav diet. 



Sarah Mallard 

universities, relatives, professors. 



Lucille Lamb 

dance orchestras, popular tunes. 



Eleanor Miller 

Dutch girls, windmills, tulips. 



Frances Lazenby 

inooiilinht shining through Spanish moss. 

Imogene Monsalvatge 

rich, hlack and gay orange of a 
Mariposa lily. 






1930 



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cTWAIDS and a e^TVIAN 



Jamie Move 

high heels, Irish smiles, liahy ways. 



Sallie iMae Pardlie 

star athletes, stag lines, academy hups 



M.4RGARET MoVE 

current events, track meets, history 

teachers. 



Alice Patche 

race, twinkling toes. Duke University. 



Hilda Nelson 

paint brushes, dreamy eyes, 
marionette shows. 



Isabelle Plunkett 

cherrv trees in bloom — days in old Japan. 



DORRIS NOWELL 

freckles, brilliant sunsets, colors of 
green and blue. 



Ophelia Ponder 

an easy chair beside a glowing fireplace, 
an open copy of Vei'gil. 



Nell Nowlin 

one unerring purpose." a perfect 
attitude toward life. 



Dorothy Powell 

Romance languages. Eiffel Tower. 
Miss Page's praise. 




1930 ^MmgS' ' ^^MPIT^^ 



cTVlAIDS and a c^AN 



LiJMiL 







Anne Robertson 

a mischievous elf dressed in wood green. 



Elizabeth Shapiro 

SocUo \^ agga — the cannihal guard- 
footlights — make-up. 



Frances Robinson 

Mai Je Antoinette — daint\ hlue hair rihhon^ 
— pearl necklaces. 



Dorothy Sharp 

sunshine after showers — sport shoes- 
\ ogue — English classes. 



Minnie Lee Rubenstein 

the best all around. 



Marion Sharp 

gay printed chint? — Daniel Webster. 



Carolyn Sancken 

cheer leaders, basketball games, loud 
speakers, a cloud of dust. 



Amelia Sheftall 

tail slender poplar trees — announcements- 
field dav. 



Frances Scott 

liiillege Humor — clowns — Jester's bells. 



MAin Sheppard 

a prism reflecting all of the sun's 
bright colors. 



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1930 



cTVlAIDS and a cTWAN 



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\ ERA ShiMOFF 
little, carved. Japanese statuette. 



C.LARA \ lOKDEia 
flaiipt-relte - jazz l>aruls. 



Aluertine Te.mpleton 

""Geiillenieii prefer blunder — 
lilue-eyed jientians. 



ESTELLE WaGNON 

a sunny brook rippling over briglu pebbles 

— surprise packages. 



Margaret Templeton 

award pins — speed tests, flying fingers. 



Helen Walkek 

reverie — spring fever — tlie »urld outside. 



Louise Tho.mas 

Carolyn Sancken — automobile rides- 
t peanuts anil lollipops. 



AiLEEN Wallace 

Lang's Fairy Stories — soft music. 



Marjorie Tidvvell 

a modern Portia — Billie Dove — 
peach blossoms. 



Irene Weathers 

"laugh and the world laughs with )ou" 
— Oglethorpe. 




1930 



^^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^i^^MniiiTM^^m^ 



'JM. cTMAIDS and a^MAN Mf^MllkM}^ 




Ruth Williams 

likes —giggles — sparkling champagne. 



Doris Wolfe 

Queen of the Fairies — 

Fisher Body — hearts. 



Ann Willis 

Beech Island — long rides — "Bob" 



\ 



/ Scz, 



O^'Jo 



/ 



y The girl of today with her skirts blowing high 
Is a lot more comfortable I sez, sez I 
Than the prim little miss of the davs of vore 
With her dress very full nearly dragging the floor. 
The lass with her locks over one shoulder thrown 
Didn't dream of short skirts and hair cut wind blown. 



Girls change with the times I sez, sez I 

And why do their parents all nearly die? 

The mothers sigh and shed many tears. 

\et down in their hearts thev know they're "old dears' 

With hearts that are pure and as solid as gold 

Still they're "outrageous" and '"terribly bold. " 

Mary Sheppard, '30. 



\ 



/ 



1930 



cTVlAIDS and a cTVlAN 



Fchniary Seniors 

Martha Anderson 

that sotitlieni drawl — wind blown linb. 



Frances Gardner 

shy spring blossoms of trailing arbutus- 
still purple haze of distant mountains. 



Elizabeth Bailie 

ex(|uisite old-fashioned jewelry — steeple 
chase — high jumps. 



Lois Harris 

rl scouts — camp fires — scribes. 



Mary Burch 

busy bees working in the sunlight — peace- 
ful, quiet, green meadows. 



Margaret Henson 

talking pictures — vitaphone productions 

Elizabeth Dicks 

soft-eved southern belles. 



Louise Hildebrandt 

G. S. "C. W.— track meets. 



Frances Farmer 

freshlv pulled sirup candy — cascades 



Edmunda Hine 

Atalanta"5 race -athletics. 




cTWAIDS and ac^MAN 



Mfeniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^fe^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim^ 




Louise Hughes 

history books — athletic tiyouts. 



Dorothy Mixon 

!>lden voiced nightingale- 
Miss Cherry Blossom. 



Sue Hunter 

hrnwn-evfd Susan — finely spun corn silk. 



Lena Mulligan 

Greta Garho — soulful expression. 



Norene Maddox 

Martha Washington silhouette — cameo. 



Mildred Murphey 

Curly locks — Mother Goose Rhymes. 



^Lenora Meredith 

the latest styles in spectacles — 
Marcelle waves. 



Grace Olafson 

valiant Norsemen — The Tortoise and 
the Hare. 



Lucille Meyers 

Cinderella— flowers thai hloom in 
the spring. 



Matilda Otvvell 

red dresses--nasturtiunis — Book of 
Knowledge. 



cTWAIDSandacTVlAN 



Mildred 1'\i,mi;i{ 

liltlr. ilainlv. li:il)V lace. 



Elizabeth Pritchard 

"that si-hocil girl complexicin" 
Mary Margaret. 



Hattie Templeton 

"smiles that make \ou happy' 
sable-winged lilackliird. 



Ofhell\ Kkjkerson 

echoes — radios — cornets — 

wind instruments. 



Louise \ erdell 

the little French girl— 
"seen but not heard" 



Sadie Kose.man 

timid white wood violets- 
still-life scenes. 



.Jane W eatherhorn 

fair weatlier — ocean waves. 



Mildred Smith 

Kud> \ allee's voice — Pepsodent ads 



Ethel W ilkersox 

wedding hells — cooking stoves- 
farewells. 




1930 



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cJMAIDS and acTWAN 



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Dorothy Wilkinson 

Old Erin — Maiilen of the Emerald Isle. 



Madkl Yolngblood 

flaxen-haired (hdU truni S\ve(.len. 



-^^^mB-^^^ y^'^^^^' 



Junior Class 

r sv.denl Rose Wilson 

Vice-President . . . . Caroline Bailie 
Secretary and Treasurer ■ - Carolyn Izlar 

# 

Motto To the Highest Point 

Flower Red Rose 

Color Red and IT hite 



1930 



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cTWAIDS and a cTVI AN 






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cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 




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Queen Elizabeth 
"In the days of good 
Queen Bess." 



(Dtg,anxzat\ons 



cTVlAIDS and a cTWAN 




Annual Staff 



Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
Literary Editor 
Art Editor 
Athletic Editor 
Picture Editor 
Joke Editor 
Copy Editors 
Feature Section Editor 
Advertising Manager 
Faculty Advisor 



Josephine Fry 

Maudie Mae Jarrell 

Dorothy Sharp 

Frances Robinson 

- Elizabeth Bailie 

Kathleen Jones 

Sarah Doichty 

Ruth Grear and Doris Wolfe 

Wynona James 

Ann \^ illls 

Mrs. Ridgely 



1930 i 



25 



cTVlAIDS and acTWAN 




Dramatic Club 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Josephine Fry 

Marguerite Starke 

Elizabeth Shapiro 

- Mary Sheppard 



SPONSORS 

Miss Marguerite Cousins 
Miss Eleanor Boatwright 



MEMBERS 



Anderson, Dorothy 
Ashley, Margaret 
Bacon, Clio 
Bacon, Mamie 
Bailie, Caroline 
Barnard, Helen 
Bearden, Eleanor 
Biggar, Betty 
Carstarphen, Mildred 
Dansby, Lois 
Derrick, Helen 
Devereaux, A'Woods 
Evans, Laura 
Ferris, Martha 
French, Alberta 
Fry, Josephine 
Fullbricht, Miriam 



Garten, Frances 
Gibson, Llewellyn 
Gracey, Judith 
Graham, Claire 
Greene, Mary Frances 
Goldberg, Margaret 
Hagcerty, Mary 
Halford, Acnes 
Harrison, Helen 
hildebrandt, louise 
Holliday, Nell 
IvEY, Glenn 
IvEY, Martha 
Izlar, Carolyn 
James, Birdie Ella 
Jarrell, MaudieM. 



Kitchens, Gertrude 
Lam KIN, Mattie 
Levkoff, Estelle 
Lundy, Ruth 
Merry, Margaret 
Monsalvatce, Imocene 
Montgomery, M. E. 
Nelson, Hilda 
NowELL, Dean 

NOWELL, DoRRIS 

Pearlstein, Lillian 
Pierce, Miriam 
Pomerance, Evelyn 
Patche, Alice 
RucKER, Myrtle 
Sancken, Carolyn 



Shapiro, Elizabeth 
Sharp, Marion 
Sheftall, Amelia 
Sheppard, Mary 
Shimoff, Vera 
Starke, Marguerite 
Taft, Josephine 
Thomas, Louise 
Tiller, Harriet 
Walters, Mary M. 
Webb, Evelyn 
White, Carolyn 
Williams, Ruth 
Willis, Mary 
Wilson, Rose 
Wolfe, Doris 



M^ 



^iSii 



1930 



cTWAIDSandacTWAN ^ 




Literary Society 

OFFICERS 

Presuleni Eleanor Bearden Secretary 

Vice-President - Josephine Fry Treasurer 

SPONSOR 
Miss Marguerite Cousins 



- Wynona James 
Amelia Sheftall 









MEMBERS 






ACKERMA1\, 


E. 


Bush, -M. A. 


Evans, L. 


Kitchens. G. 


Ponder, 0. 


.Sharp, M. 


Bailie, C. 




Cadle, E. 


Fry. J. 


Levkoef, E. 


Printip. a. 


Sheftall. A 


Banks, L. 




Carstarphen. -M. 


Gibson, L. 


Mallard. .S. 


Richardson, V . 


Shimoff. \ . 


Bates, L. 




Carswell, B. 


Graham. C. 


AIarsh, a. 


Rucker, M. 


Stone, 0. 


Bearden, E 




Des Combes, E. 


James. B. E. 


Nelson. H. 


Sancken, C. 


Williamson 


BiNNS.E. 




Eaves, V. 


James, W. 


Pierce, M. 


Sharp, D. 


Wilson, R. 



M. 



President 



Ashley. M. 
Baird, D. 
Crosson, S. 



yJrt Club 



OFFICERS 

- Hilda Nelson Secretary ar.d Treasurer ■ Ruth Harris 

SPONSORS 
Miss Naomi L rich Miss Bermce Wiese 



Di near, K. 
Garvin, G. 
Harris, R. 



MEMBERS 



I 'owe, S. 
Hlnt, S. 
Hynes, A. 



Knowles, I. 
Knowles, M. 
Levkoff, D. 



Nelson, H. 
Pierce, V. 
Sheppard. M. 



Stephens, V. 
Taft, J. 

TurRMONI). \I. 



^ ^^Illllllll ^i^^ 1930 



1<^ 



cTWAIDS and acTWAN 




Student Council 



OFFICERS 

President . . . . 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Eleanor Binns 
GoLDiE Brantley 
Margaret Roesel 



Honor League 

OFFICERS 



President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Marjorie Tidwell 
Lucille Willlams 



Miss Gertrude Comey 
Miss Bernice Wiese 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Miss Eleanor Boatwright 



Miss Mary Miller 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Senior A — Marjorie Tidwell 
Senior B — Eleanor Binns 
Senior C — Mary Creed 

Junior Al — Anne MgLendon 
Junior A2 — Mary Allen Phillips 
Junior B2 — Elizabeth Minton 
Junior CI — Lois Dansby 
Junior C2 — LeNA ScOTT 

Junior C3 — Margorene Goodman 
Junior C4 — GoLDiE Brantley 

Sophomore Al — Ruth Harris 
Sophomore A2 — Margaret Roesel 
Sophomore A3 — Katherine Sancken 



Sophomore B — 
Sophomore Cl- 
Sophomore C2- 
Sophomore C3- 
Sophomore C4- 



Freshman Al- 

Freshman A2- 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 



A3- 
B - 
Cl- 
C2- 
C3- 
C4~ 



Freshman C5 — 



-Virginia Booth 
-Lucille Williams 
-Mertys Adkins 
-Alma Inglett 
-Rebecca Williams 

-Helen Dolinsky 
-Judith Gracey 
Frances Longeway 
Elizabeth Bostick 
Ruth Redd 
Blon Morris 
Mary Speering 
Bernice Krage 
Dorothy Pender 



1930 




A Helen Wills of 
The Gay Nineties. 



Ottjkttcs 



c^TMAIDS and a cTWAN 




Athletic . ~lssociatio)i 



OFFICERS 



President 

I ice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 



Edmunda Hine 

Miriam Pierce 

Dorothy Newman 

Amelia Sheftall 

■ Birdie E. James 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Senior Representative ■ - Claire Graham 



Junior Representative 
Sophomore Representative 
Fresh/nan Representative 
Faculty Representative 
Faculty Representative 
Faculty Representative 



Laverne Edwards 

- Rebecca Guest 

Mary Speerinc 

Miss Boren 

Miss Rice 

Miss Green 



1930 



cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 



V,,->!^ 'i,l .,' ■•.< > ill 






: ^^: 



'm^I 




Senior Rasketba/I Team 

Forwards HiNE, Leaptrotte. Ashley. Nowell 

Guards . - . . CHAPMAN, Jarrell. R. Williams, Jansen 
Centers WiNGO, Sheftall. Hughes, W. James 

Manager ----- Edmunda Hine 
Captain - - - - Maudie Mae Jarrell 



Senior Soeeer 'Team 



Center Forward 
Left Wing 
Right Wing 
Left Inside 
Right Inside 
Center Half 



WiNGO. Captain 

Eaves 

W. James 

- Graham 

Hine, Manager 

Nelson 



Right Half - Mershon Jansen 

Left Half Fry 

Right Fullback - - - Jarrell 
Left Fullback ■ Chapman. Kitchens 
Goalkeeper ■ - - Sheftall 



^mw 



1930 



JTTTTMTfThTTIS^ ' 



^.■^'iiiiiiiiiniiiii^i^ 



cTMAIDS and a cTWAN 




Junior Basketball learn 

Forwards Edwards, Cadle. Hardy 

Guards - - - - E. Speering, Mesnard, Bicgar, B. E. James 
Centers WiLSON, PiERCE, Harris. Barnard 

Manager HoPE Mesnard 

Captain "Funny" Edwards 



J II )i tor Soccer Team 



Center Foncard 
Left Wing - 
Right Wing 
Left Inside - - 
Right Inside 
Center Half 



- - Leaptrotte 

Mesnard 

■ Cadle, Hughes 

"Funny" Edwards 

Barnard 

- Pierce 



Right Half . . . . Moore 
Left Half, B. E. James, Bailie, Mgr. 
Right Fullback - - E. Speering 
Left Fullback - WiLSON, Captain 
Goalkeeper - - Taylor. Harris 



^^ 



1930 



cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 




Sophomore Basketball J earn 

Foncartls - - - L. Williams. Newman. Snellgrove. Brown 
Guards - - Witt, Sanders, Fullbright, Woodward, Stalling 
Centers JoNES, Harveston. Guest. Coleman 

Manager Llcille Williams 

Captain Dot iNewman 

Sophomore Soeeer Team 

Center Forward - ■ Flllbright Right Half - - - . Newman 

Left W ing . - - - Hardin Left Half Guest 

Right Wing - - - Harveston Right Fullback - - ■ Sanders 

Left Inside . - . - Buck Left Fullback . - - . Rice 

Right Inside - . - - Witt Goalkeeper . . . - Boysen 

Center Half ■ - - Woodward 



Ml 



1930 



cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 




Freshman Basketball Team 

Foriiards - - - Mary Speering, Sanford. Hardy, Harrell 

Guards Taft, Swain, Hains, Gaines, Gannt 

Centers Havird, Bostick, Des Combes, Boozer 

Manager MaRY SpEERING 

Captain Vera Havird 



FreslDNan Soceer Team 



Center Forward 



Hardy 



Left Wing 
Right Wing 
Left Inside 
Right Inside 
Center Hall 



- Taft. Smith 

- Hains, Jernigan 

Mary SPEERI^G 

- Swain, Boozer 
L. Williams, Captain 



Right Half - 
Left Half - 
Right Fullback 
Left Fullback 
Goalkeeper 



Hallman. Brady 

Stelling 

Havird, Manager 

- Fullmer 

- Snellgrove 



1930 






c;7VlAIDS and a cTWAN P" ^ -^^ "'^ 'C^ 



A Poem 



Half-way betwixt heaven and earth 
\^ ith only the blue o'er head. 

Aurora, the mother of Mirth. 

\^ as unfoldinji the curtains of red. 



c 



Beneath, the shining waters blue. 

Made placid by \ei)tune's hand. 
Rivaling heavens own hue. 

Were beating upon the sand. 

From afar she viewed the loftv trees. 

Maiinificent children of old Svlvanus. 
Crooning a melodv on each breeze 

Were upholding their arms to Olympus. 

The fields were lovelv under Ceres* care; 

Sheets of waving golden grain 
Presented a picture of beauty rare 

Thriving from the plentiful rain. 

Here a band with voices loud 

Singing and dancing in jovous glee 

Had gladlv left the citys crowd 

To enjov the quiet of the flowered lea. 

Now the tranquil dav is o'er 

And Aurora filled with contentment deep 
Begins night's shades to loer 

Then on each thing falls the veil of sleep. 

LLE^vELLY^ Gibson. 



c-->'"^^^"^^- .,. ..-^.,^, ..^., ^.^ x^2>(d ?% •'" c '^ - <C% '-""-c^T 



34 






Helen of Troy 

"The face that launched 
a thousand ships." 



features 



ffl^lllllllillllilllli^^M cTWAIDS and a ^MAN P^^'l'lllll'l 




Most Beautiful — DoRis Wolfe 



1 1930 



cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 




Most Intellectual — Marjorie Tidwell 



1930 



IM^; 



tTMAIDS and a cTWAN 



UL-: 




Best All Round — Claire Graham 



1930 



cTVlAIDS and acTVIAN 



|i^;i^hiiillii!iiliii^ 




Most Popular — Maudie Mae Jarre ll 



^-^^' lllllllll^?Jlllllll!ll!llllk^M 



1930 SS 



K^ 



cTMAIDS and a cTVlAN 




Most Stylish — Frances Robinson 



1930 



imuT\\\ 



c^AlAIDS andacTWAN . 




Most Athletic — Edmunda Hine 



1930 



^i^^^^iM „.. ^^Ml tTWAIDSandacTVlAN R _ . . .. ^JM 



trtjE lagt ®8SiU ant) Qtestament 
of tlje Class of 1930 



HE class of 1930 is in a very critical condition, in fact if it survives the next 
few weeks it may have a chance of recovery. A consultation with the faculty, 
whose ability in such cases is exceptional, was held May 28 and a diagnosis 

of the case was made. The physicians agreed that the crisis would be reached 

Thursday. June 12. 

The disease is verv complicated — nervous prostration due to overstudy, cramming, 
worry over low grades and exams — heaviness of the heart at thoughts of parting and 
physical breakdown caused by stampedes subjected to during lunch hour — excessive 
swelling of head (with corresponding shrinking of brain I which has been gradually 
increasing during the last four years and has now reached the most perilous stage. 

Mindful of her condition she has drawn up this will in order to prevent any squab- 
bling over her worldly goods. 

WILL 

We. the 1930 Senior Class of Tubman High School, Augusta, Georgia, do hereby 
publish this, our last will and testament revoking and making void all former wills 
made by us at any time. 

L We do direct that our funeral be held by our friends and well-wishers — oh. yes! 
and the faculty. — and shall be held with fitting pomp and ceremony. With the ex- 
perienced Sarah Zealy and T. Harry as chief mourners. 

II. To Father T lime I, our beloved principal, we do give and bequeath some much 
needed tact — s. 

To the faculty we do be(|ueath peaceful nights and restful days — until they return 
to the madhouse in September. 

To the Jolly Juniors we do give and bequeath our pet lizardr;. ,-nakes and frogs; 
also our notes containing vast stores of information on all subjects. 

To the Sophomores we give our advice which will keep their heatls from swelling on 
account of Junior dignity and help them to bear exams and failure manfully. 

To the Freshmen we leave whatever the Juniors and Sophomores throw away in- 
cluding all Planters emptv peanut bags, ten of which sent to the Planters Companv. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., will entitle them to a beautiful thirty-two page painting book. 

To the June Seniors of 1931 we do leave our accustomed seat in Chapel, which 
they have so long covetsd. 

And we hereby constitute and appoint Mis- Gertrude Comey (our legal advisor 
during these trying four years) sole executor of this our last will and testament. 

In witness whereof, we. the class of 1930. the testators, have to this will set our 
hand and seal this tlav. May 19. Anno Domini one thousand nine hundred anil thirty. 



1930 



KfailllillillHillltaB ^TWAIDS and acTMAN IBSaiiiillllll .! I!fia'!il!l|l||i!i ji-^'^ 



^roptjecp of Cf)c Senior ClasiS of 1930 



May 15, 1950. 



Dear Maudie Mae: 



It seems a shame that you. President of the June, 193U, Class, were unable to attenil 
our twentieth reunion, but I realize how busy vou have been since the L nited States 
joined the League of Nations. How do you like representing good old Uncle Sam 
over there? I know vou must enjov it as you used to love to study about it in Mis^ 
Wiese's History Class at Tubman. 

Speaking of Miss Wiese, she was at the reunion and vou should have seen her. 
Fat! — that tloesn't begin to describe it. but then she's married now and living a life 
of leisure. Several of the other teachers were there also; Elizabeth Henrv and Annie 
Bee Daniels, both old and grey as would be expected. But enough — I know you are 
anxious to hear about some of the old crowd. 

Well, the first day we met at Tubman, our old one on Walton Way, and spent 
several hours getting acquainted again. We were then taken on a tour of the city. At 
one o'clock we were taken to the Bon Air where the Rotary Club entertained us with 
a luncheon. I haven't enjoyed anything as much since the last one twenty years ago. 
On mv left was Estelle Wagnon; she is studying the care and feeding of gold fish at 
Agnes Scott, as she thinks it will aid her when she goes to house-keeping in the fall. 
Ann Willis, now the business manager of the peanut stand at the corner of Seventh 
and Broad, sat on my right. Next to Ann were Isabel Plunkett and Mattie Lou 
Grimaud, President and Vice-President of the stand; they say they employed Ann 
because of her experience as advertising manager of the 1930 Annual. I also saw 
('lara Verdery. Eleanor Miller. Agnes Halford. Mary Dennis, and Eleanor Bearden 
who are doing charity work in Augusta. 

That afternoon we saw Mary Creed who just received Lon Chaney's place in the 
movies. Her first picture was "Whoopee, the War's Over." A most entertaining pro- 
duction, I assure you. After it we returned to the hotel to rest and talk. Naturally 
some of the girls beside vourself were unable to come, but Sarah Doughty, who, by 
the way, has been made editor of The College Humor, told me about some of them. 
Sarah says that she owes all she is to the Tubman Annual of 1930. But back to the 
missing girls — Alice Patche was unable to get down to the reunion as she is a fashion 
model in a New \ork store. Sarah said not to tell anyone, but Alice is hoping this 
will be her last position before going on the stage. Mary Stone and Ruth Williams 
have gone to Arabia in hopes of fintling two wandering sheiks; imagine them on 
camels. Sarah Mallard, Llewellyn Gibson, and Mary Haggertv are now police-women 
in Chicago and as yet are in perfect health. 

In the evening we had dinner at the hotel and afterwards in the ballroom we looked 
in on the television. Maudie, you couldn't guess who we heard, and saw, broadcast- 
ing — Marjorie Holland, A. Woods Devereaux, Frances Garten and Ophelia Ponder, 
the famous quartette, sang several numbers, among them "Over the Hills and Far 
Away." Eleanor Binns and Hilda Nelson announced for station I. 0. L . Thev gained 
their wonderful speaking voices by making chapel announcements of "Very Impor- 
tant Meetings." We also heard two lectures by former Tubmanites, one by Mary 



51 1930 £51 



.>li 



cTVIAIDS and a cTWAN 



Soulluill nil ulieie the "Tower ol loiuldii" is located. The other by Irene Weathers 
on the South Sea Island dress was extremely interesting, as Irene lia^ just returned 
from Iceland. 

Speaking of lectures, do you remember when Mr. Hardy came to Tubman and 
wanted some of us charming voung ladies to go on a Washington tour/ Well, Lucille 
Lamb has just completed her thirteenth trip around the Chinese Wall. She will start 
on the fourteenth one next year and wants all people who are interested in the tour 
to <-all her home — 178-J. 

Just as we were about to turn the television oil dainty Doris Wolfe was seen dancing 
the tango. After watching her for a few mniutej we went up to our rooms. 

The next day we were entertained with a big party at the new Augusta Pond by Mil- 
dred Lorick and Anne Robertson, both charming members of the younger married 
set. as would be expected. At luncheon I talked to Amelia Sheftall. now gym teacher 
at Tubman. 

In the afternoon we heard a very educational debate by Carolyn Sancken and 
Louise Thomas on "Should Teachers Who Object to Noise Be Barred from the 
Schools y" I also saw another girl who is teaching at Tubman now. Katie Evans i- 
yelling "Don't look at your typewriter keys." to all the little Junior C's. 

That evening I was forced to catch the plane back to New York, as my new 5-and-l(! 
mail order house was to open the next day. 

I must close now. as it is late. 

I hope we can have another reunion again some dav and that vou will be able to 
attend it as they certainly are fun. 

Love, 

Dot 
P. S. — The girls all sent their love and best wishes. 

D. S. 




]^/;^lllllllllllllill ^ll""" l i'l''i^ 



cTVIAIDS and acTWAN 



"HALFWAY DOWN" 



"Halfway clown the stair: 
Is a stair 
Where I sit. 
There isn't any 
Clher stair 
Quite like 
It. 



I'm not at the bottom, 

I'm not at the top; 

So this is the stair 

Where 

I always 

Stop." 



I wonder what A. A. Milne would .=ay. it he knew that I was using the title, and 
was quoting part of one of his poems? Plenty, probably, if he read this theme, but 
he won't read it. Maybe, if I had told him that I was planning on using this work oi 
his, he would have written three things differently. 

"Mr. Milne," I would say, when somebody introduced us, "do you remember that 
poem you wrote called "Halfway Down"? You do? Well, would you change the title 
to "Seven Steps Down"? 

"Why?" he would ask. 

"Because," I would rejjly, "when I go downstairs, I stop en the seventh step." 

"Very well," Milne would answer, writing it down on a slip of paper. "Is there 
anything else I should change?" 

"Yes." I would declare, "will you use 'stand' instead of to 'sit'?" 

"What line is "sit' in? A. A. would question, trying to be polite. "Never mind, I 
see it. Let's see. If I change 'sit' to 'stand' what will 'it' rhyme with?" 

"Oh, change 'it' to 'and'," would come my bright respond. 

'"Let s see," that is his favorite expression. "Now my poem reads: 



"Seven steps down the stairs 
Is a stair 
Where I stand. 



There isn't any 
Other stair 
Quite like 
And. 



"No. That doesn't make sense? May I use 'pause' instead of 'stand'?" 
"All right," the words would come out of my mouth without my knowing it. 
"Here! How is this? " and now he would recite: 
"Seven steps down the stairs 

Is a stair 

Where I pause 



There isn't any 
Other stair 
Like it 
Lause; 



"Fi 



grand! excellent!" I would exclaim. "'Now, could you — I mean — would 

you change 'always" in the next to last line, to 'sometimes'?" 

"Of course," the famous child's poet and mystery murder writer would mutter. 

"Now my poem is all right, isn't it?" His voice betrays his doubt. 

"Well!" I would utter. ""Well, we haven't started on the second verse vet.' 

"Just a minute," he would cry, as if someone had called him, "I'm coming." Then. 

turning toward me, in the humblest of voices, he would beg me to come again. 

'"Christopher just called me and I can't keep him waiting. Goodbye! " A. A. Milne 

would cry disappearing tiirough the doorway, almost at a run. 



1930 



:^1I^^" _ .-.'.'S^ cTWAIDS and a tTWAN i 



• • ■ FOR THOSE 
WHO LOVE FINE THINGS 




A NEVi ELEMENT WOMAN 

SYMBOL— WO 

A member of the liuinan laniilv. 

OCCl RRENCE — Can be found wherever man exists. Seldom occurs free or 
in native state. Q'ualitv depends on the state in which it i- found. 

I suallv the combined state is preferred. 

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES— All colors and sizes always appears in disguised 
condition and its face is usually protected by powder and paint-. Boi 



bitter. 



at notli- 
WiU melt if 



mg and freezes at any time. If not used correctly, it 
properlv treated. 

CHEMICAL PROPERTIES— Extremely active. Has a great affinity for gold, 
silver, platinum, and precious stones. Absorbs all expensive foods. Sometitne- 
vields to pressure. Ages rapidlv. fresh varieties are more attractive. It is a very 
dangerous element and highly explosive. Therefore, it should not be handled 
bv inexperienced hands. 



^ 










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--^^^^■ 


1930 


^i^i^iiiiiiiiiiiim^iiiiiiiiiiiM^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw^^ 



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lis: 



oTWAIDS and a cTVlAN 



t^^Jj:/jL>Aj^^A 


Lombard Iron Works 


^im^Vt44^Vtyi^y^ 


and Supply 


^^^^TaDILS OUTFITTFOS ^^^^ 






( .ompaiiy 


"The Store of Better Values" 


Augusta, Georgia 


AUTHENTIC STYLES 


MACHINERY, SUPPLIES 




REPAIRS. CASTING 


WOMEN AND MISSES APPAREL 


ROOEING. PUMPS 


MILLINERY AND ACCESSORIES 


IRON AND CHAINLINK FENCE 


MODERATELY PRICED 


EVERYTHING FOR THE MILL 



Him: ""And why do you call nie Pilgrim'.''" 

Her: "Well, every time you call you make a little progress." 

"Is it true that statistics prove women live longer than men?" 
"Well, vou know paint is a great preservative." 

Teacher: "Now. pupils, what do we come to school for?" 
Stud ous: "To train our faculties." 

Dumb: "Only fools are certain, wise men never are." 
Ditto: "Are you sure?" 
The same: "I am certain." 



Realty Savings and 
Trust Company 

o27 Broad Street. Augusta. Ga. 

Paid in Capital 8100.000.00 

5', ( Paid on Savings 
5|9r Paid on Time Certificates 



nilJIU TORS 



.mux I'HixizY 

.JAMES K. l,EA(;i-K 

T. 1>. CASWEI.I, 

<■. K. I.A^VKEXCK, .IK. 

.1. LEE ethekei>(;e 

KI-SSEI.I. K. WHAI.EY 
C. H, I'HJXIZV, SK. 
HK-XKY f;. HOWARD 



A. li. VllX KAMI' 
<IEl>K(iE SAX<K1-:X' 
P. H. RICE 
J. KRAXK CARSWEI,!, 

I.ERUY \Y. LY-ETH 

R. J. MAX^VELI. 

.1. <;. lSEI,UIX"r. 



Compliments of 

Augusta Lund3er 
Company 

Phones 
275 and 276 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



g-^pin^.^'^'i'!!'-|!'l':'<^^|H||||!J|;:;;i!^ 



1930 



cTVIAIDS and a cTWAN j_ 



5 



Graduale Operatois 



Phone 2287 



MRS. ED. SHEEHAN. JR. 

Pidprielress 

Leonard Beauty Slioppe 

Specializing in 

PERMANENT WAVING 

Prices .S7..S0. $10.00, $12..S0, and 81.S.00 

408 Leonard Building .\ugusta. Ga. 

"Thf Smartest Sfioppe in Toicn" 



Plu.ne 1101 



910 Broad Street 



H.Shi 



imerling 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
.lEWELER 



Cash Or Credit 



Cash Or Credit 



!• ive 1' loot;- I' iiie Furniture 

Culpepper Brothers 
Furniture 

lOlU and 1021 Broad Street 
Augusta, Georgia 



Compliments of 

C. D. Kenny Company 

TEAS : COFFEES : SUGARS 
Broad Street, Augusta, Ga. 



Pat was visititig the house of a friend who was the proud owner of a parrot. Pat 

had never seen one before. 

"Hello!" exclaimed the bird as tlie visitor walked past the cage. 

Pat turned in amazement and after staring at the parrot for a moment, raised his 

cap in salute. 

"Good morning to vez," he said politely. "Sure, at first I thought vez was a 

bird." 



WARREN C. DAVENPORT'S 

Musicove, Inc. 

RADIOS. RECORDS AND 
SHEET MUSIC 

309 Eighth Street 
Phone 3438 



Congratulations to the 
CLASS OF 1930 

National Bellas Hess 
Company, Inc. 

830 Broad Street 
.Augusta, Ga. 



Millii»;an Adv. Service 

OUT DOOR ADVERTISERS 
August.^, Georgi.\ 






SbxonQ/SimSHoo(a 



^i=AVAYS BUSV 



^n^^l! imiili^i^ 1930 



A<>r 






;^^^iiiiiiiii!i!iiiif?^^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiE^iiii 


cTVIAIDS and a cTVlAN M£^' 




'llllilll^^^ll 


«v 






— i^ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Georgia Railroad Bank 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Mrs. Gray: "Ah. jimiv. I wonder if my husband will l()\e me when mv hair is i 



gray .' 

Mrs. Black: "Why not? He's loved vou through lhre2 shades already. 

Miss Boatwright — "Mary Elizabeth, who were the minute-men?" 
Mary Elizabeth — "Thev were a whole lot of fast boys." 



ClauSSfenS 

Bread - Cakes 



Since 1841 



South's Favorite 



r> 



.<-» 



mm 



iMii 



1930 Ml 






cTWAIDS and a oMAN 



SOLICITS VOLR BUSINESS 

Interest Paid on Savings Quarterlv 

Start Life Right by Opening a Savings Account 

Total Assets Over 880,000,000.00 

NO ACCOUNT TOO LARGE— NONE TOO SMALL 

Acts as Executors, Gl'ardians, Trustees 



Scene: Lunch room. , 

Time: 12:20 or 12:25 P.M. 

Senior: "Who are vou shoving?" 

"Bright Fresh: "I clunno — what's va name?" 

Adam was a lucky man 
Who lived in days of yore. 
No one could ever tell him 
'"I've heard that one before." 



Q-UALITY above ALL 

Herff Jones Conipaiiv 

Designers and Manufacturers 

of 

Hiiih School and Collejiie 

Jewelry 

and 

Commencement Invitations 

Official Jewelers to 
Tubman High School 



Mi 






GardenCity 

Engraving Co. 




M^^z^MX&J)P^^3m^t 



PHOTO ENGRAVERS 

DESIGNERS 
PHOTO RETOUCHERS 

PHONE 1886 

j| August a. Ga. 






cTVlAIDS and a cTWAN 



-^^ 
^ 



OF AUGUSTA 

A National Bank with a Savings Department 

in which every Tubman Girl is cordially 

invited to have a Savings Account 

Start While Young 

Affiliated with The First National Bank of Atlanta and the 
Southeast's Largest Banking Group 



Thev call her appendix because somebody is always taking her out. 

When caught robbing the cash-register in a fish store, be nonchalant, smoke a 
herring. 

Mr. Montell: Frances, how do you look best, smiling or serious?" 
Frances — very unconcerned: "Either way." 



Augusta Sporting Goods Co. 

Distributors 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, and 

P. Goldsmith Sons Co. 

Athletic Equipment 

Golf and Tennis Supplies 

Rackets Restrung 



212 Eighth St. 



Augusta, Ga. 



Compliments of 




Phone 2722 



AUTO TOP AND TIRE COMPANY 

COMPLETE CAR SERVICE 

566 Broad Street 



£'■ 



K^TT-TTT'lTm-^ 



1930 



?' 



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cyMAIDS and a cTWAN | 



9 



( Augusta 



George C. Baird & Company 
Certified Public Accountants 



Georiria 



-o 
C 



I Infants" Wear 



E. C. Balk & Company 

918 Broad Millinerv. Gifts 



Compliments of a Friend 



t Hull, Barrett & Willingham 

1 Augusta Attornevs-at-Law 



G 



yeorgia 



WHEN HISTORY WAS YOUNG 

Miss Wiese: Melba. do you mean to say that vou can't name all the presidents 
we have had? \^ hen I was \our age I could name them all. 
Melba: ^ es, but there were only three or four then. 

Some girls with a negative personality may be developed in a dark room. 

An Irishman was telling his friend of a narrow escape in the war. "The bul'et 
went in me chest and came out me back," said Pat. 

"But,"' answered his friend, "it would go through your heart and kill you. " 
"Me heart was in me mouth at the time," came the quick reply. 

Comey: "If Shakespeare were alive todav. wouldn't he be looked upon as a re- 
markable man?" 
R. Williams: "I'll say so. He would be three hundred years old." 

Passerby: "What would vour mother sav. little boy, if she could hear you swear 

like that?" 

Boy: "She'd be tickled to death if she could hear it." 

Passerby: "How can you lie like that?" 

Boy: "That's no lie. She's stone deaf." 



The Henry Hltt Plumbing Company 
611 Broad High Grade Plumbing Supplies Augusta. Ga. 



1 04 Masonic Bldg. 



Scott Nixon 
Insurance 



Trade in Augusta 



J. C. Penney Company 
824 Broad Street Department Store 



Augusta, Ga. 



J. B. White & Company 
I Augusta Service — Loiv Prices — Reliability Georgia 



cTWAIDS and a cTWAN 



Aujjusta Grocery Co., 614 Walker Street, Augusta. Ga. 
Augusta Shoe Repairing. Sawilowsky's. 



Bailie Furniture Co., 712 Broad Street 



Blanchard & Calhoun, Real Estate, Marion Building 
Bowen Bros., Hardware Co., 905 Broad Street 



Alex. G. Edelblut Furniture Co., 319 Eighth Street 

Gardelle's : Drugs : 712 Broad Street 

(Georgia Vitrified Brick & Clav Co., Augusta, Ga. 

Hansberger's Pharmacy, 934 Broad Street 

W. L. and W. J. Hatcher, Autos, 521 Broad. Phone 44. 



The Augusta Herald 



N. Hildehrandt : (groceries : 226 Sixth Street 
Leasiue, Duvall & Powell. Realtors, Herald Building 



W. P. Manning Music Co. Pianos, 315 8th St. Phone 3327 
Mulherin & Marks Shoe Co., 862 Broad Street 



Mur))hv Stationery Co.. 756 Broad Street 



F. Phinizv & Co., Insurance, 124 Eighth Street 



Rhodes-Harkins Furniture Co., 1051 Broad. Phone 672 
Stark, Cleaning and Dveins;, 743 Broad. Phone 769 



H. C. Tennent Supply Co., 1251-53-55 Broad Street 



cTVlAIDS and a cTWAN 



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